The following items were taken from the Nov. 20 through 26, 1910, Examiner.

The following items were taken from the Nov. 20 through 26, 1910, Examiner.

Roy Myers, a lineman for the city’s electric light department, narrowly escaped death. Wires had been cut to allow the cutting down of a tree and he was replacing them at the top of a pole. The wires were supposed to be “dead,” but when he grabbed one to steady himself, they were very much alive. His index finger was burned to a crisp and broke off, his left side was burned terribly, and one of his ribs was burned completely in two. His shirt and suspenders caught fire and added to his tortures.

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The first hold up in the history of the Independence cross town line took place Nov. 21. A negro boarded the car as it was ready to start to town. John P. Phipps, the conductor, supposed he was a passenger. Suddenly, the negro stuck a big gun at Phipps’ breast and made him give up what money he had, about $6. Seeing an opportunity, Phipps, after being robbed grabbed the barrel of the gun. In the scuffle, the men rolled off the car. The negro broke loose and ran. The conductor, who had a gun in his own pocket, now had the opportunity to draw it and fired three shots, but so far as is known none took effect.

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Just how it happened that Independence has two Forest avenues is not known, but it is a fact. One is in the Southeastern part of the city and runs from South Main to the fair grounds. The other is in the Western part of the city and forms the boundary line between city and county. The awkwardness of having two streets of the same name was called to the attention of the city council. A general belief was expressed that the name of one should be changed, and the sooner the better.