Boy Scout Troop 201 in Independence is holding an Eagle Court of Honor Saturday, for four new Eagle Scouts.

Scott Jenkins

Scott Jenkins, son of Kevin and Ginger Jenkins, joined Troop 201 in November 2014. Scott is a fifth-generation scout in Troop 201, following in the footsteps of his great great-grandfather Wilbur, great-grandfather Russell, grandfather Charles and father Kevin. Along with his grandfather and father, he is a third-generation Eagle Scout.

Scott also shares the love of Scouting with his great-grandfather, Henry Mullnix, a Boy Scout troop leader; great-grandmother Frances Mathews, a Girl Scout troop leader; grandmother Gloria Jenkins, a Girl Scout Gold Award recipient; and his great-uncle David Mullnix, an Eagle Scout.

Scott earned 42 merit badges on his trail to Eagle. He has logged 46 nights of camping and 145.3 services hours. In the Tribe of Mic-O-Say, he is Warrior Second Son of Least Little Clever Hand. He is a Brotherhood member of the Order of the Arrow.

Scott’s Eagle project was to build an outdoor turtle habitat at Burr Oak Woods Nature Center in Blue Springs. The project also included building a bench dedicated to “my great-grandmother Frances Mathews. She founded the ‘Wild Ones’ group at (Burr Oak). She taught me all I know about wild edible plants.”

Scott says, “I would like to thank my Uncle David Mullnix (1971 Eagle Scout). He gave me a suggestion that led to the idea for my project.”

His troop leadership responsibilities have included assistant senior patrol leader, librarian, historian, patrol leader, instructor, troop guide and chaplain’s aide.

He has earned the Arrow of Light, the Coup of the Long Trail, Founder Tribal Guardian, the Twelve-Month Camping Award, Scuba BSA, 2015 Klondike Derby second place, Totin' Chip, Troop 201 – Band of Brothers, the Cyber Chip award, Historic Trails, the Troop 201 Uniform Award, National Outdoor Camping Gold, the World Conservation Award, National Youth Leadership Training and the Recruiter’s Award.

“One of my most treasured moments in Scouting was the troop’s 2019 High Adventure to South Dakota,” he said. “I was able to see many great things including hiking up Black Elk Peak. I was far from home and was able to experience the wilderness.”

Scott is on the build team with the CTC Inspire robotics team at Fort Osage High School. He enjoys online gaming with his friends. He’s in the National Junior Honor Society. His goals include graduating from high school and graduating from college.

One of Scott’s biggest influences was his grandfather Henry Mullnix Jr., who he says taught him to “work hard, be kind and more.”

Others who were big influences on his Scouting career have been Leah Jennings, Al Miller, Joanne Miller, the Brison Family, his father Kevin Jenkins, and brother Derrick Jenkins.

“My mom (Ginger Jenkins) was my greatest mentor outside of Scouting,” he said. “She was always willing to help. She always encouraged me to keep going.”

Grant Newhard

Grant Newhard started as a Tiger with Cub Scout Pack 201. He joined Boy Scout Troop 201 in March 2014.

Grant earned 42 merit badges on the trail to Eagle. He has logged 44 nights camping and 46.3 service hours. He is a Warrior in the Tribe of Mic-O-Say and a Brotherhood member of the Order of the Arrow.

Grant’s Eagle project, benefitting Jackson County Parks + Recreation, was planting 250 trees along the Little Blue River.

“The river should be cleaner as the trees will absorb the runoff from the road and some of the air pollution from the buildings that are eventually going to be built in the area,” he said.

Leadership lessons that Grant learned were “how to effectively plan and communicate. It becomes a lot harder when you are the one doing all the planning and communicating. When you are working with multiple groups that aren't connected, it can be difficult to get everybody and everything on schedule.”

His troop leadership responsibilities have included assistant senior patrol leader, quartermaster, patrol leader and scribe. He has earned the Arrow of Light, Troop 201 Junior leader training, 2015 Klondike Derby second place, the Cyber Chip Award, Paul Bunyan Woodsman Award, the Troop 201 Just Do It Award, Totin' Chip, the Troop 201 Scout Spirit Award, the Troop 201 Band of Brothers award, the World Conservation Award, National Outdoor Camping Award Gold, and National Youth Leadership Training.

“One of if not my first overnights was to the first ever Scouting 500,” Grant said. “Spending the days and nights outside and getting a taste of what it would be like in Scouting was probably the biggest defining moment for me.”

Grant is a member of the Blue Springs South High School Jaguar Pride Marching Band, and he’s been named to the presidential honor roll for having a 4.0-plus grade point average. He plans to attend college.

Grant says his mother, Diana Hite, has been a big influence.

“Just about everything, she's been with me for my whole life and has taught me a lot I know about being a good person in general,” he said. “She's been the biggest influence I have, what she's done has shaped me into the person I am today.”

He said his brother, Zachary, was the biggest influence in his Scouting career, and he says his father, Jeff Newhard, has been a great mentor in Scouting.

“He kept pushing me to show up and do the work even when I didn’t want to,” Grant said. “He was there for me when I needed him and sometimes when I didn't. He's been with me every step of my Scouting career.”

Alastair Deweese

Alastair Deweese earned 59 merit badges on his trail to Eagle. He has logged 57 nights of camping and 69.6 service hours. In the Tribe of Mic-O-Say, he is Tom Tom Beater Storm Buffalo. He is an Ordeal member of the Order of the Arrow.

Alastair’s Eagle project was beautification of a back garden lot benefiting the students who attend Great Circle, which offers behavioral health services.

“Great Circle wanted a garden area, and they made it, but it looked barren and not appealing to the kids,” he said.

A leadership lesson Alastair learned is that “patience is everything.”

He also learned “that grass can grow very large.”

His troop leadership responsibilities have included senior patrol leader, den chief, patrol leader, troop guide, scribe and quartermaster. He has earned the Arrow of Light, the Coup of the Long Trail, the Den Chief Coup, the Staff Coup, Founder Tribal Guardian, the Twelve-Month Camping Award, National Outdoor Camping Gold, 2015 Klondike Derby second place, 2019 Klondike Derby second place, Paul Bunyan Woodsman, Totin' Chip, Troop 201– Band of Brothers, the Cyber Chip Award, the Troop 201 Just Do It Award, Historic Trails, Chieftain Coin and the World Conservation Award. He has done den chief training and National Youth Leadership training.

“I’m in the Mic-O-Say Dancers,” he says, “because I think it’s fun and has a very family vibe to it, and theater because I got dragged into it and enjoyed it.”

“Kevin Jenkins was a big influence on my life and Scouting career,” he says. “That planning and communicating is key to leadership. He was my Scoutmaster he always kept a cool head (unless it was really bad) and was always the one guy who if all else fails I can rely on. [He] always kept pushing me to do my best to be my greatest and to always aim higher.”

Alastair’s great mentor outside of scouting is James Hobbs.

“He is my stepfather; he always kept the expectations high and always tried to do his best to help me.”

He plans to graduate from high school and attend a trade school.

Tyler Harris

Tyler Harris began his Boy Scout career in 2012 after earning his Arrow of Light in Pack 201. He is in a Scouting family with uncles and brothers. Tyler felt that his most challenging leadership position was “patrol leader because you have more responsibilities. And younger boys looking to you for advice to guide them with.”

Tyler earned 40 merit badges on his trail to Eagle. He has logged 84 nights of camping and 33.8 service hours. In the Tribe of Mic-O-Say, he is Tom Tom Beater Quick Running Turtle. He is a Brotherhood member of the Order of the Arrow.

Tyler’s Eagle project benefited the George Owens Nature Park in Independence. His project was to enhance a holding pond, improving drainage, providing better soil conservation and allowing for wildlife to better inhabit the area.

“My eagle project was to rebuild a wetlands garden, which is a funnel-like hole to help with the rain and builds habitats for nature,” he said. “The nature park now has a nice-looking wetlands garden instead of an overgrown hot mess, to make the park look nice for visitors and give more habitats for the park.”

His troop leadership responsibilities have included patrol leader, instructor, quartermaster and scribe. He has earned the Coup of the Long Trail, the Twelve-Month Camping Award, National Outdoor Camping Gold, the 50-Miler Award, Totin' Chip, the World Conservation Award and Troop 201 junior leader training.

One of his favorite awards “was earning the Coup of the Long Trail because I got to go to Minnesota and canoe over 50 miles.”