Jacob Misiorowski and his family are going to do their best to make Wednesday as normal as possible.


“I’ll probably throw some in my backyard, and my grandparents are coming over (Wednesday night), just in case something happens,” the quiet young man with the strong right arm said.


He’s referring to the revised Major League Baseball Amateur Draft, which begins at 6 p.m. Wednesday, and there is a chance the recent Grain Valley High School graduate could be a selection.


“I really don’t expect anything Wednesday, because they’re just doing the first round, with the next four rounds on Thursday, but you never know.”


On May 13, Major League Baseball released a list of the top 200 collegiate and prep draft prospects for the draft and Misiorowski was ranked No. 160. With the draft reduced from the usual 40 rounds to just five this year, only 160 players will be drafted Wednesday. That means a limited amount of pool money for each team, and undrafted players are limited to just $20,000 signing bonuses, whereas some drafted in rounds 6-10 have gotten six figures in the past.


If that happens to The Examiner’s 2019 Player of the Year, he knows exactly what path he will follow.


“I decommitted from Oklahoma State University and am going to Crowder Junior College in Neosho, Missouri,” said the lanky right-hander, who was 9-2 with a 1.49 ERA and 67 strikeouts in just 47 innings as a junior at Grain Valley. “I owe a lot to OSU, they gave me an offer when I was a sophomore, and I was so excited, but right now, the junior college route is the best for me if something doesn’t happen in the draft.


“That way, I go to Crowder, really work on my game and be in the draft next year, over even the next year. And then, if nothing happens in the draft, I can go Division I, so it’s pretty exciting to think about everything that can happen at Crowder.”


Misiorowski said he was caught off guard when MLB ranked him at No. 160.


“That really surprised and pleased me,” said Misiorowski, who missed his senior season at Grain Valley because of the COVID-19 pandemic. “I haven’t been able to pitch 100 percent since last baseball season because I had a high hamstring pull, and it really limited what I could do on the mound.


“I did go out to an invitation-only camp in Long Beach, California, where I pitched for the Northwest team, and I did all right, but I wasn’t 100 percent. I’m 100 percent now, and that is one reason I was so excited about this spring, playing with my friends and being healthy.”