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Days Gone By: A moment of worship and thanks

The Examiner

From The Examiner during the week of Nov. 16-21, 1970:

• “AREA CHURCHES PLAN SERVICES OF THANKSGIVING ON WEDNESDAY” – A number of local churches will cooperate in holding special Thanksgiving services next Wednesday night. Offerings taken at four services sponsored by the Independence Ministerial Alliance will go for the “Meals for Millions” foundation.

The services include First United Presbyterian Church, 100 N. Pleasant; the Rev. Dr. Billy D. Hurt, pastor of the First Baptist Church and Ministerial Alliance president, will be the speaker. The other sites: St. Mark’s United Methodist Church, 603 N. Jennings Road; Christ United Methodist, 14712 E. 39th St.; and Mount Washington RLDS Church, 9412 Independence Ave.

Eating out cost less half a century ago, as seen in this ad in The Examiner 50 years ago this week.

• “‘BEVERLY HILLBILLIES’ STARS AT NOLAND ROAD BANK SATURDAY” – Television’s best-known banker, Raymond Bailey, who plays Banker Drysdale on “Beverly Hillbillies,” will be here Saturday to help Noland Road Bank observe its fifth anniversary. Banker Drysdale (Bailey) will bring along his television secretary, Jane Hathaway (Nancy Kulp) for a morning of autograph signing and visiting.

Hopefully, Paul Henning, a native of Independence, the originator-producer-director of “Beverly Hillbillies” and several other television series, will accompany his two stars.

From The Independence Examiner during the week of Nov. 15-20, 1920:

• “TAKING ON CITY WAYS” – The City of Sugar Creek, which was incorporated by order of the county court, Monday, is taking hold of the job in earnest, though handicapped by the fact that it has no city funds and probably will not have until April. The new mayor and board of aldermen met Wednesday night. H.R. Boehman was sworn in as mayor. Up to the present time Sugar Creek has been simply country, and looked after by a deputy county marshal.

• “FRISBEY MILL BURNS” – The mill of the Frisbey Feed & Fuel Company, 200-208 East Walnut Street, was almost totally destroyed by fire at 2 o’clock this morning. The loss was estimated at $7,000, and the insurance almost as much. Jack Kerry, a fireman at the electric light plant a couple blocks northeast of the mill, saw the fire and gave the alarm to the fire department. When the fire department arrived the inside of the mill was a roaring mass of flames, and nothing could be done except prevent the fire from connecting with the coal sheds of the company some distance from the mill.

• “FOWLS HARD TO GET” – A truck load of live geese passed through Independence Friday morning on the way to the Kansas City markets. The driver did not throw off his power or put on brakes in Independence. The market in Kansas City is, geese 25 cents, ducks 28 cents, turkeys 40 cents, chickens 14 to 18 cents, all on foot. There are practically no fowls in the Independence markets. The dealers have their lines out for chickens, ducks, geese and turkeys for Thanksgiving and expect to have a plentiful supply but will make no quotations until the first of the week.

• “BITS OF GENERAL NEWS” – The German government has served notice on the League of Nations that it no longer considers itself bound by the Treaty of Versailles because, it alleges, the nations comprising the League have not complied with their promises. This announcement, however, does not create the excitement that a disturbance of this kind would have created before the great war, inasmuch as the nations in the League know as well as Germany does that all Germany can do in her present condition is to protest.

– Compiled by Jeff Fox