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OPINION

The death penalty must go; Examiner right to air differing views

The Examiner

Julie Briggs, Independence

To the editor:

This is in answer to a letter from Don M. McNulty that appeared in The Examiner on Dec 21, headlined “The Examiner is a socialist rag.”

I do not consider The Examiner a socialist rag for printing an opinion, not a news article, but someone’s opinion of the death penalty and the big rush to kill off prisoners. It is a newspaper’s duty to provide facts and only facts for articles, but to also provide opposite views on social issues of the day.

Mr. McNulty, as a supporter of President Trump, I am going to assume you are a conservative Christian, as most of his supporters are. As another conservative Christian and very much a pro-life advocate, I fail to understand your attitude to mercy in combination with justice. The teachings of Christ in the New Testament call us to protect life, practice mercy and reject vengeance.

No matter how heinous a crime, every soul deserves to have until his last natural breath to repent. Even the murderer next to Jesus on the cross was forgiven when he repented. God should decide when we die, not another person and not our government.

Whenever I have expressed this belief, I have heard from others who proclaim to be Christians the hope that such crimes never happen to my family or I would change my tune. I can only reply, that should such a thing ever happen, I hope and pray I can find forgiveness in my heart for whomever commits that crime.

As St. Pope John Paul II said:

“… calls for followers of Christ who are unconditionally pro-life: who will proclaim, celebrate and serve the Gospel of life in every situation. A sign of hope is the increasing recognition that the dignity of human life must never be taken away, even in the case of someone who has done great evil. . . . I renew the appeal I made . . . for a consensus to end the death penalty, which is both cruel and unnecessary. January 27, 1999