Sheila Solon, a Blue Springs City Council member, returned to her council forerunner – the Planning Commission – Monday night as the council liaison for the volunteer board.

It was familiar territory for Sheila Solon – just on the other side of the room.

And she only got to enjoy the view for about 10 minutes.

Solon, a Blue Springs City Council member, returned to her council forerunner – the Planning Commission – Monday night as the council liaison for the volunteer board.

Prior to being elected to the council, Solon was on the commission for nine years.

“I appreciate all the volunteers who serve our city,” Solon said.

Previous council members in the position have taken the opportunity to ask questions about developments or state their opinions, but Solon, who is also mayor pro-tem, said she plans to take this as an opportunity to observe the commission and report back to the council.

“It’s the job of the liaison to observe what happens,” Solon said. “They (the commission) are a separate entity. I certainly wouldn’t want to influence their decisions.”

Solon is also hopeful this new role will help her continue a line of communication between the commission and the council

It’s a role she takes seriously.

“I want to give them a voice on City Council,” Solon said. “Ways we can help them do their jobs to the best of their ability. I want to communicate their concerns to City Council.”

Solon emphasized her point with an example from her tenure on the commission. Commissioners had concerns that people who lived just outside the 185-foot notification area weren’t getting word about plans for a given project. They also expressed concerns that signs weren’t being posted at sites as city ordinances required.

The commission worked with the city to ensure the posting ordinances were being followed, and Solon hopes to continue that kind of communication.

“The UDC code book, issues they think the City Council needs to know,” Solon said.

Solon’s first meeting as liaison was also the first meeting for Mark Trosen. Trosen, who works with Jackson County Public Works, was appointed by the City Council last week to the commission – replacing George Deibert. Trosen previously served on the city’s Tax Increment Finance Commission.

Trosen and Solon barely had a chance to get their feet wet as the only agenda items were final layouts for two parcels of Parkway Estates at Adams Dairy Parkway and Moreland School Road.

The first was for 21 single-family homes on 4.86 acres. The second was for eight single-family homes on 3.3 acres. Both were approved unanimously with Commissioners Michael Parker and George Abbott absent.