Davy Crockett was a legend on the frontier. He spent time in the United States Congress, and he stood against the Indian Removal Act – the act that resulted in the infamous Trail of Tears.

Davy Crockett was a legend on the frontier. He spent time in the United States Congress, and he stood against the Indian Removal Act – the act that resulted in the infamous Trail of Tears.

That legend will be discussed in a special program Saturday at the National Frontier Trails Museum in Independence.

“The Davy Crockett program will introduce people to Crockett’s early years, experiences on the frontier, and in particular the time he served as a Congressman,” said Richard Edwards, education coordinator at the museum. “His career as public servant is noteworthy for his opposition to Andrew Jackson’s desire to remove American Indians from the states to designated Indian Territory in (today’s) Midwest, regardless of whether they had assimilated. This removal led to such tragedies as the Cherokee Trail of Tears, along which many of those oppressed people perished.”

The program will be 2 p.m. Saturday at the museum, 318 W. Pacific. Admission is $6 for adults, $5 for those 62 and older and $3 for children ages 6-17. Reservations are not required. The presentation will last about 30 minutes and is included with museum admission.

Edwards said the museum tries to offer a variety of programs that focus on westward expansion. He said through the Crockett presentation, he hopes people will learn that he was a man of principle and character, character that was formed by his experiences on the frontier.

“Museums such as ours play a vital role in helping the community understand our shared heritage and culture,” he said. “Programs such as this one not only allow us insight into what shaped our national character, but also contribute to a more complete understanding of the often conflicting forces that have shaped our identity.”

Edwards said attending events at the museum such as this will help to give varying perspectives on many well-known aspects of westward expansion – in this case the events that unfolded around Crockett.

“People should attend this event because it is our responsibility as citizens to know our history,” he said. “The pursuit of knowledge is a lifelong vocation. It is also fun and a great way to share time with the family at a place dedicated to making our community a better place.”

For more information on the program, call the National Frontier Trails Museum at 816-325-7575.