When the citizens of this nation go to bed each night, they can do so secure in their homes without fear that the government will send someone to break down their door and arrest them for having exercised their right to worship God wherever they please, or not at all. Amendments I and IV give us that right.

To the editor:

When the citizens of this nation go to bed each night, they can do so secure in their homes without fear that the government will send someone to break down their door and arrest them for having exercised their right to worship God wherever they please, or not at all. Amendments I and IV give us that right.

James Madison and 38 other signers of the United States Constitution wanted you to have that right. No, they would never know you personally, but they wanted to assure that all future citizens had protection from the power of government. If you want to protest by burning our precious flag in the street, you can do so. The 39 signers of the U.S. Constitution wanted you to have such freedom. The rest of us can only stand by viewing your actions and hoping that maturity will overcome you quickly.

On May 14, 1787, delegates to revise the Articles of Confederation showed up at Independence Hall in Philadelphia. The Articles of Confederation weren’t working very well for the 13 states, since each coined its own money and set its own taxes. The U.S. Congress was attempting to function with a depleted treasury, inflation  and a depressed economy.

These were men of vision and common sense. They knew the heart of man could sometimes be greedy and the quest for power overwhelming, and so they realized that all the generations to come after them must be protected. For documents of such importance that they sheltered us from dictatorship, anarchy, famine, civil war, political corruption, fascism, communism, etc., our government made a very casual attempt at sheltering the Constitution and Declaration of Independence documents.

The freedom of the citizens of these United States rests on thin parchment paper with faded ink, which consists of four sheets approximately 28-3/4 x 23-5/8, housed in hermetically-sealed cases filled with inert helium gas that would plunge them into a vault underground at the first hint of fire, vandalism or nuclear war. They are a constant reminder of the priceless gift of time and talents that 39 men thought we deserved.

Your Bill of Rights should be as important to you as your Social Security number, for it is the enduring 222-year-old promise to you that the government’s powers over you can never be exceeded. Every American home should have a copy of the Constitution displayed where we could be reminded daily of how blessed we are to live in this great country and how seriously we hold our rights.