Prop B. quandary! State Rep. Casey Guernsey, in his recent report, did a bang-up job explaining how the Missouri legislature is competent to ascertain what people think. I am unsure how these talented people are able to do this. I was taught that if we needed to know the general public’s view on a given subject, then voting would be preferred to clairvoyance.

To the editor:

Prop B. quandary! State Rep. Casey Guernsey, in his recent report, did a bang-up job explaining how the Missouri legislature is competent to ascertain what people think. I am unsure how these talented people are able to do this. I was taught that if we needed to know the general public’s view on a given subject, then voting would be preferred to clairvoyance.

In a democracy, an issue is placed on a ballot and each side is free to drum up support for its view. The Supreme Court has declared no limit on the amount of money a corporation, group or individual may spend in supporting an issue. When the ballots are counted, the issue is settled. We may agree or disagree with the outcome of the voting, but in a democracy we are obligated to abide by the voters’ decision. Our preferred outcome on an issue may not be the winning side any more than our candidate may be the winner. It is the duty of our legislature to abide by the ballot decision. Otherwise the legitimacy of any election is in danger of nullification.