I recently had a very pleasant pre-dedication visit to the new Mormon temple in Liberty. It is a beautiful edifice on a magnificent site and the whole event was handled flawlessly. As there was no opportunity for public questions, we were encouraged to address questions to our assigned guides as we moved from room to room.

I recently had a very pleasant pre-dedication visit to the new Mormon temple in Liberty. It is a beautiful edifice on a magnificent site and the whole event was handled flawlessly. As there was no opportunity for public questions, we were encouraged to address questions to our assigned guides as we moved from room to room.

Quietly at the back of our group, I asked the wife of our guide if she had been “sealed” to her husband “for time and eternity,” and she said “yes.” I then asked that if she had been so unfortunate as to die early in her marriage would her husband have been permitted to remarry and be sealed for time and eternity with a new wife? She answered “yes.” I then pointed out that in such a case she would be living in polygamy in the afterlife. This seemed to be something she had never seriously considered.

Thus, Mormon temples can be considered monuments to Mormonism’s continued belief in the sanctity of polygamy, inasmuch as anything considered to be heavenly conduct should certainly be acceptable on earth.

But in order to quell any anti-Mormon feelings, we need to understand that all religions, including mine, have beliefs that could be considered by non-believers to being irrational. One should understand that religion, by its very nature, is not made true or untrue by scientific or empirical proofs. There are many things in life that are very real, but are beyond the power of science or the human mind to really understand, let alone try to explain.

There is no way to scientifically explain a mother’s love, or that of a father who runs into a burning building with total disregard to his own safety if he believes one of his children might be in danger.

Love can’t be dissected and placed under a microscope, but it is nevertheless more precious, real and meaningful than polished jewels or burnished gold.

This is not to suggest that religious beliefs don’t matter, or that they should be exempt from critical questions regarding ethics, morality or justice. More young people have been driven from religion by being forced to accept what they know to be wrong, than by a critical analysis of how some religious beliefs are simply based on an honest attempt to answer certain difficult questions.

In this respect I like the religious philosophy espoused by John Robinson in his July 1620 farewell address to his beloved pilgrim flock. As they departed from The Netherlands to the New World he said, “I am confident that the Lord hath yet more truth and light to break forth out of His holy word.”