U.S. Rep. Emanuel Cleaver announced Friday he secured nearly $2.4 million in federal dollars for Harry S. Truman historic sites in Independence and Grandview.

U.S. Rep. Emanuel Cleaver announced Friday he secured nearly $2.4 million in federal dollars for Harry S. Truman historic sites in Independence and Grandview.

Cleaver said in a lengthy statement that he won final approval of funding requests for the National Parks Service in Independence.

The funding becomes law as part of the Interior, Environment, and Related agencies appropriations report that passed Congress Thursday and was expected to be signed by President Obama Friday.

The bill allocates $1.01 million for renovating and adding interpretative exhibits to the Noland House across from the Truman home. Also, $1.3 million for land acquisition at the Truman farmstead in Grandview. Both projects are part of the Harry S. Truman National Historic Site.

“I am so pleased to announce these funds that will further the great work already being done at the Truman National Historic Sites,” Cleaver said in a statement.

“It is my great honor to represent the home of one of America’s greatest presidents and these funds will help continue to tell his story. Particularly at this point in our nation’s history, we need to be listening to the lessons taught to us by President Truman. Students and statesmen alike are wise to learn from his example.”

The Noland Home. located at 216 N. Delaware St., is where Truman’s aunt and her family resided.

The home sits across the street from the home of Bess Wallace and her family that would later become the Truman residence. It was through this proximity that Truman met his wife, Bess.

The money will restore the Noland Home and install exhibits that address the influence Truman’s neighborhood connections had on the development of his character, according to the release.

The exhibits will also present the Harry S. Truman National Historic Landmark District, which the Noland and Truman homes are part of, and emphasize the importance of the district’s continued preservation.

The $1.3 million secured for the Truman farm will allow the National Parks Service to acquire part of the original farmstead.