There are thousands of homeless animals in the United States. Animal shelters and rescue groups work hard to place as many animals as possible in permanent homes. There are two main problems volunteers face when trying to place animals.

There are thousands of homeless animals in the United States. Animal shelters and rescue groups work hard to place as many animals as possible in permanent homes. There are two main problems volunteers face when trying to place animals.

First, there is a problem with many people viewing animals as disposable. Unfortunately, in our “throw away” society, many people get rid of their pets as casually as they discard an old pair of shoes. Some animals end up back in the shelter six months after they are adopted. Many of these animals go through the cycle of shelter to home several times before they are either euthanized or end up in a permanent home.

The second problem is the adopter’s preference of young animals. Animals that are six months old or older are much harder to adopt out than younger animals. The theory that one needs to get an animal when it is young in order for it to easily adapt to its new environment is unfounded. Many older animals can fit well into a new environment assisted with some love and understanding. One advantage of adopting an older animal is that it is usually easier to house train, and many older animals have already been house trained. Once they feel secure and safe in their new environment, and a relaxed adult animal can be a better companion for adults and children alike.

That being said, I would like to do several articles in the coming weeks about older animals that are looking for permanent homes. These animals are just as sweet and loving as young animals.

This week I would like to introduce you to Missy. She is a 10-year-old Cocker Spaniel who was neglected by her former owner then abandoned. This poor girl’s coat was matted and full of fleas. She was thin and starving when an ABF member found her and took her to a veterinarian. Missy was groomed and treated for her fleas. She is getting healthy now that she is eating well, and she is working on house training. Missy gets along well with other dogs, walks well on a lead and enjoys car rides. Missy is a happy girl who loves people. She just wants to be with someone who loves her. Missy has some hearing loss but overall seems to be in good health.

It would be wonderful for Missy’s story to have a happy ending where she is adopted into a loving home for the rest of her life. If you are looking for a loving dog to join your family and think Missy might be a good fit, please go to our website and complete an application.

Animals Best Friends wish list includes: Purina Dog, Puppy, Cat and Kitten chow, dog and cat treats and chews, cow hooves or rawhides, canned dog and cat food, stuffed (no beads) and Kong toys, laundry detergent, bleach, Fantastic spray, Dawn dish liquid, paper towels, newspapers, 39 gallon trash bags, blankets, sheets, cat litter. There is a paper recycling bin in the parking lot at ABF Headquarters, 2302 S. Crysler Ave., Independence. Please, no cardboard or telephone books. We appreciate your support.