Although Danielle Dubar is excited abut graduating from high school, she is not looking forward to the growing number of responsibilities becoming an adult will bring.

Although Danielle Dubar is excited abut graduating from high school, she is not looking forward to the growing number of responsibilities becoming an adult will bring.

“I am glad it’s over,” the 2011 Grain Valley High School graduate said. “But I will miss high school because there are not as many responsibilities. We are growing up and going in different directions. That is a little scary.”

Dubar was one of 229 students to graduate from Grain Valley High School Tuesday at the Community of Christ Auditorium. Eleven students graduated with a 4.0 grade point average and six students are Bright Flight Scholars. These students earned an ACT composite score in the top 3 percent of all students in Missouri.

In addition, 46 students are members of the National Honor Society. The class of 2011 earned more than $1 million in scholarships.

Superintendent Roy Moss urged the class to stay in touch with each other after graduation in his commencement address. Prior to his speech, he also asked for a moment of silence to remember those in Joplin, Mo., and in Oklahoma after Tuesday’s tornadoes.

“As I begin to think about my high school days, it made me realize how precious each moment, each day and each year really is,” he said. “We need you to be graduates. We need you to take on our responsibilities, and we need you to take our place in society. We need your energy and your ideas.”

Tyree Meadows, student body president, said through all of the ups and downs, one group has always been there – family.

“Our families have always been there for us,” he said. “Take the time to remember all of the good they have done for us. This is our time, but without our family, none of this would have been possible.”

Abbey Sapp was one of the designated class speakers. She said each of the class of 2011’s individual journeys has led to this point. She said their high school career, however, has not been without sadness, remembering drama teacher Jerry Mueller, who died unexpectedly in November 2008.

“Mr. Mueller had a profound impact on our class, and he will not be forgotten,” she said. “High school has prepared us for this moment, but now it is up to you to decide what to do with your life. I challenge each of you to search within yourself to make the best decision about your life.”

Graduate Shalynn Johnson said she is “kind of nervous” about what is to come now that she is a high school graduate. She said one day she was beginning her freshman year, and now it is almost summer with high school over.

“I am going to miss my friends the most because I won’t be able to see them every day,” said Johnson, who is attending MCC-Longview this fall. “I am going to miss Ms. (Leslie) Baker the most. She taught U.S. history, and we were like best friends. My advice? Pay attention in class and don’t let activities get in the way. But at the same time, have fun so you have the best experiences.”

Graduate Matt Mallott said he feels like he is on a “roller coaster.” He plans to attend Missouri State in Springfield to major in computer science.

“I think it feels that way because we are not quite there,” he said. “Take hard classes as often as possible. That is the best piece of advice I can give.”