The activities surrounding the recent open house ceremony for the home rehabbed by the NorthWest Communities Development Corporation were covered very well by The Examiner. What is hard to put into words were the caring and hope that are as much a part of 201 N. Ash as the construction materials and work that went into the project.

The activities surrounding the recent open house ceremony for the home rehabbed by the NorthWest Communities Development Corporation were covered very well by The Examiner. What is hard to put into words were the caring and hope that are as much a part of 201 N. Ash as the construction materials and work that went into the project.

The project was really more about the hope for what the future will bring not just for this neighborhood, but for our community. If there is truth in the adage that tells us any portion of a community can be a preview of the entire community’s future; then each of us who call Independence home has a vested interest in these ongoing revitalization efforts in western Independence. Certainly we should all want our community to be that special place where we can each live, work, and raise our families, and a place we are proud to call home.

For me the answer to “Would I help with the project?” was easy. As I stood on the porch of this house, I could look across the street and see the home where my family lived during the time I grew up and attended Fairmount Grade School and Van Horn High School. This was a time when the sense of neighborhood and family was evident, when neighbors looked out for and cared about each other.

It was a time when if you needed help or even a little correcting when Mom and Dad were gone, there were many wonderful neighbors such as the McInturffs or the Hickmans who were there. Without question it was and is a great place to grow up or to even grow old.

At the ceremony was another great community resource – Crime Prevention Officer Rob Romey of the Independence Police Department. Officer Romey, who is as talented as he is committed, was there to offer his valuable services to implement a neighborhood watch program.

The program is not simply an effort to reduce crime. This is a program to bring neighbors together to build or to maybe just awaken that sense of community pride and caring. This is an opportunity I truly hope the neighborhood takes advantage of. The cost? It’s only a little bit of your time, and the benefits could be priceless. 

I would be remiss not to extend a special thanks to Monte Short and Howard Penrod. We couldn’t have completed this project without them.

If you have the opportunity, walk through the home. You won’t just see the good work that was done. I think you can feel the hope and caring and catch a glimpse of the vision we have for our community.