Writers, rejoice. November is upon us.



Why is this significant? Because November is National Novel Writing Month, more commonly known as NaNoWriMo.

Writers, rejoice. November is upon us.

Why is this significant? Because November is National Novel Writing Month, more commonly known as NaNoWriMo.

NaNoWriMo is a yearly event that issues a challenge to every aspiring writer in the world: write one 50,000 word novel over the course of thirty days. That equates to about 1667 words a day.

Crazy? Certainly. Impossible? Far from it.

NaNoWriMo began in July of 1999 with only 21 writers. It was the brainchild of one Chris Baty, a resident of the San Francisco Bay area, who grabbed his friends and coaxed them into joining him on his literary escapades.

Over the course of the month, Baty and his noveling companions found that with the peculiar combination of the time limitations and the word count requirements, writing became not an act of attempted perfection, but an adventure. And the thrill of that adventure caught on.

In 2009, 10 years after the first 21 writers started the National Novel Writing Month phenomenon, the NaNoWriMo Web site was up and running and the event had well over 100,000 participants. NaNoWriMo had caught on, and caught on hard, as writers across the globe came together to support each other and create a strong, caring community. Now in its eleventh year, NaNoWriMo continues to grow and act as a catalyst for bringing about noveling success.

Plenty of people want to write novels, but so many never take the chance to try. A large part of the stall has to do with a pronounced fear of failure, and the idea that everything has to be perfect, else there’s no point in writing at all.

What NaNoWriMo does is takes away the blocks that keep writers from creating. The time constraints force writers to turn off their “inner editors;” the point of NaNoWriMo is quantity, not quality.

By allowing the ideas to flow uninhibited, writers find that they can tap into wells of creative energy that they’d never dared to dream they possessed.

 So take that idea that’s been festering in the back of your head for ages and turn it into a novel.

Take a chance, make the leap; you won’t be sorry. Even if you don’t make it across the 50,000 word mark, just giving it a go is incredibly liberating.

For more information, as well as the official rules and regulations, head over to the Web site: www.nanowrimo.org. If you’re interested in participating, or just curious, I would recommend checking out the site sooner rather than later. It’s notorious for crashing, or at least being obscenely slow, in the first few days of November.

National Novel Writing Month begins at midnight, November 1. Are you with me?