Have you heard…. skipping breakfast can help you lose weight? Did you know…fat is bad? Do you believe…sugar causes diabetes? When it comes to myths, nutrition myths top the list. Don’t be fooled this April Fool’s Day. Instead, wise up with these real facts about food and health.

Have you heard…. skipping breakfast can help you lose weight? Did you know…fat is bad? Do you believe…sugar causes diabetes? When it comes to myths, nutrition myths top the list. Don’t be fooled this April Fool’s Day. Instead, wise up with these real facts about food and health.

Skipping breakfast can help you lose weight: False. Current research shows when people eat 400 calories at breakfast, they tend to eat 200 fewer calories throughout the day. Children who eat cereal for breakfast are 75 percent less likely to be overweight.

Skipping meals is an easy way to lose weight: False. Not only should you not skip breakfast, you shouldn’t skip lunch or dinner either. In fact, going too long between meals often leads to overeating. If you skip meals, the body makes up for lost energy by slowing down your metabolism and conserving the calories that you have eaten by storing them as fat.

You should check your weight once a week: False (kind of). Weighing once a week is recommended when trying to lose weight. It keeps us from feeling discouraged when we see those small daily fluctuations.  However, when trying to maintain your weight you should weigh yourself everyday. If you gain a few pounds, eat less and exercise more. It is easier to lose one or two pounds than to try to lose ten.

All calories are created equal: False. Scientists for years have claimed that carbohydrates and protein each offer 4 calories per gram and fat offers 9 calories for each gram. But it is not that simple. Now we know that once food is digested by our bodies, not all calories are absorbed the same. High-fiber foods are very difficult to absorb. We also now know high-fiber and high-protein foods are the most satisfying and keep us feeling full longer.

Fat is bad: False. Gram for gram, fat adds more than twice as many calories as carbohydrates or protein. Too much fat in your diet can lead to excess weight gain. However, some fats offer potential health benefits, such as omega-3 fats. This type of fat helps prevent heart disease. Best advice, choose healthier fats from olive and canola oils, seeds and nuts, and fish.

Sugar causes diabetes: False. Although there are many reasons for developing diabetes, sugar alone is not a cause. In adults, diabetes is often a result of excess weight gain, especially around the belly, and not enough exercise. To help prevent diabetes, eat sensibly, walk regularly and maintain a healthy weight.





Spring asparagus and potato salad

Serves 8

All you need:

2 pounds small, waxy red-skinned potatoes

1 pound asparagus spears, trimmed

1/4 c. extra-virgin olive oil

1/4 c. white wine vinegar

1/8 tsp cayenne pepper

Salt and pepper, to taste

1/2 medium red onion, thinly sliced

1/4 c. chopped roasted red pepper

1/4 c. finely chopped fresh chives

2 tbsp packed sliced fresh basil

2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley

All you do:

1. Rinse potatoes and place in a large pot. Cover with lightly salted cold water. Bring to boiling and cook until knife-tender. Using a slotted spoon, remove potatoes to a plate; reserve cooking water.

2. Return water to boiling. Meanwhile, chop asparagus into 1-inch pieces. Keep the tips separate. Fill a large bowl with ice water.

3. Place asparagus (except the tips) into boiling water. Cook 1 minute, then add the tips. Cook 1 minute more. Remove asparagus from boiling water and immediately plunge into ice water. Drain and set aside.

4. For dressing, in a large bowl whisk together oil, vinegar, cayenne, and salt and pepper to taste. Quarter the potatoes; add them to the dressing. Stir gently to coat. Add the asparagus, onion, roasted pepper, chives, basil and parsley. Season to taste with salt and pepper; add more vinegar, if needed. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Nutrition information per serving:

Calories: 160

Carbohydrate: 20g

Cholesterol: 0mg

Dietary Fiber: 3g

Fat: 7g

Protein: 4g

Saturated Fat: 1g

Sodium: 15mg