The following items were taken from the Dec. 22 through 28, 1912, Examiner.

The following items were taken from the Dec. 22 through 28, 1912, Examiner.

John R. Haldeman, 46, vice president of the Schooley Stationary Company, which he started and built up to its present proportions, died of heart disease while chasing pranking boys away from his home. He fell in the back yard of Arthur Wilson, a neighbor, and was dead when reached. He was in charge of the printing department, a position he had held for six years.

Feeble mindedness is increasing rapidly in Missouri, according to Jacob Billikopf of Kansas City. He says there are between 6,000 and 7,000 cases in the state and the state hospital for the feeble minded at Marshall can only care for 400. “The others,” Billikopf says, “cannot be cared for. Today there is a waiting list of several hundred persons, every one of whom ought to be in a state hospital. As a result, feeble mindedness has increased in Missouri 100 percent in the last 10 years.”

State Railroad and Warehouse Commissioner Reuben Oglesby has called attention to the dangerous railroad crossings on the Missouri Pacific main lines between Independence and Kansas City. The warning is timely and Mr. Oglesby would do a great service to this people if he could accomplish the doing away with these crossings. Indeed, railroad crossings on grade in thinkly populated and much traveled districts, are a crime. Mr. Oglesby’s suggestion of a watchman at these crossings at all times, is not al all sufficient.
 
The Independence post office handled more pieces of mail this Christmas than ever before in the same length of time since the post office at Independence was invented. The carriers started work Dec. 26 with as much mail to deliver as they had Dec. 24. The office sold 7,000 one cent stamps on Dec. 24.