As a pastor, I appreciate the time and commitment it takes to build meaningful relationships that transform any group of individuals into a caring community of neighbors. When I first heard of the strategic policing proposal, what caught my attention was the opportunity for our police officers to spend more “informal” time in our neighborhoods.

To the editor:

As a pastor, I appreciate the time and commitment it takes to build meaningful relationships that transform any group of individuals into a caring community of neighbors. When I first heard of the strategic policing proposal, what caught my attention was the opportunity for our police officers to spend more “informal” time in our neighborhoods. I am convinced that when our officers have more time to visit with neighbors and collaborate with congregations and organizations they will become even more effective partners in our community-building efforts. And, really, isn’t that the big picture goal – we dream of friendly, welcoming neighborhoods that make safe streets a reality.

Many of my dear friends are on one or the other side of this issue, and I hear and respect the concerns the opponents have raised. As a minister, I serve the working poor and seniors on fixed incomes, and I know their plight. As a citizen, I confess I am not always enamored with my city government. As a homeowner, I will pay this tax increase.

On balance, when I think of the possibilities that strategic policing offers, I hope that we will choose to invest in the future of our neighborhoods by voting “yes” on April 3.