On Armed Forces Day, I had the honor to speak to a local patriotic chapter of The Daughters of The American Colonists. Together we are fighting to keep the Revolutionary period relevant in our history books and to ban the importation of American flags, especially from Red China.

On Armed Forces Day, I had the honor to speak to a local patriotic chapter of The Daughters of The American Colonists. Together we are fighting to keep the Revolutionary period relevant in our history books and to ban the importation of American flags, especially from Red China.

I want to thank Winnie Case, an ardent reader of The Examiner, for inviting me. To join this patriotic organization you may contact Chapter regent Mildred Mathews at 816-527-9898.

Our saddest, but most solemn, annual federal holiday is upon us – Memorial. Day.

Please take time to attend one of the many area patriotic tributes. Or, remember by visiting a military grave site adorned with a flag. Or, before you go on that picnic, golf game, baseball game, or fire up the backyard grill, at least offer a moment of prayerful silence.

It would do well to conjure up that ancient funeral praise for the dead. “That the living should prove worthy of the fallen.”

Join with me on this solemn occasion to honor all of our deceased military down our long corridor of our history.

I have written a poem about a humble fallen hero, who like all those before him, are special. He asks only: Please play taps for me.

The video of this poem: “Please Play Taps for Me” is now available on YouTube. Just type in the title, click on “downloaded this week.” If you think it is worth passing on, please do so.

I give you President John Adams’ toast: Independence forever.

 

Please Play Taps for Me

I never made it.

I tried, we all did.

Oh, that ugly face of war

I hope you never see.

I felt a higher quest

Among my generation.

That uniform and flag

Seemed to be calling me.

I’m no one special

But I proudly served.

And I was there.

My country tis of thee.

A fighter, defender

A number, a name

But it felt good to know,

They really needed me.

I give my all

That last full measure

Now deeply carved

On our family tree.

I see old men in uniforms

My mother, wife and son

And a man with a book

Praying over me.

Ah, to rest at Arlington

But they knew I’d rather lie

On precious hometown soil,

For my family to see.

And so my day is done,

But before I go,

While I’m no one special,

Please play taps for me.