I attended the Mayor’s Prayer Breakfast, but after reading several articles in the newspaper, I almost want to believe I attended a different Mayor’s Breakfast! The event I attended also featured Mr. Saleem as a speaker, but the man I saw before me wasn’t racist, hateful or questionable despite what recent letters to the editor have stated.

To the editor:

I attended the Mayor’s Prayer Breakfast, but after reading several articles in the newspaper, I almost want to believe I attended a different Mayor’s Breakfast! The event I attended also featured Mr. Saleem as a speaker, but the man I saw before me wasn’t racist, hateful or questionable despite what recent letters to the editor have stated.

I felt it was my duty to write a letter in favor of the event since the paper has simply been flooded with negativity, and I feel that the comments being said often deviate from the opinion side of the spectrum and fall into what I can only hazily call falsity. While it’s perfectly acceptable to not have enjoyed Mr. Saleem’s speech, I feel the allegations surrounding the speech and the call for an apology to be issued from the mayor and his selection committee border on ludicrous.

The speaker of the event brought up his life story involving his training at an early age under the Muslim Brotherhood, his trip to America so that he could help aid in the cultural jihad, and his eventual transformation into a Christian after a life altering event left him in the hands of the very people he was set out to inflict harm upon. While he did discuss some of the darker aspects of his upbringing, his speech was not a tirade against Islam, but rather focused on the dangers posed by the radical 3 percent of the religion in relation to Christianity and the United Sates. The majority of his remaining speech dealt with how his life had improved upon accepting Jehovah and the feelings and changes in values he experienced after doing so.