A historic steam engine will make a brief trip, without a stop, through Eastern Jackson County on Tuesday.


The Union Pacific’s steam locomotive No. 844 left its base in Cheyenne, Wyo., on Thursday, headed eastward on a goodwill tour connected with the railroad’s 150th anniversary. On Sunday, it rolls into Kansas City, Kan., but will not be on public display.

A historic steam engine will make a brief trip, without a stop, through Eastern Jackson County on Tuesday.

The Union Pacific’s steam locomotive No. 844 left its base in Cheyenne, Wyo., on Thursday, headed eastward on a goodwill tour connected with the railroad’s 150th anniversary. On Sunday, it rolls into Kansas City, Kan., but will not be on public display.

The best chances to see the train come Tuesday morning:
It arrives at 8:30 a.m. Union Station and is scheduled to sit there for half an hour.

At 9, it heads east on the UP line that runs across northern Independence, angles to the southeast and then east past Lake City, then east through Buckner and Levasy. It’s scheduled to stop in Malta Bend, Mo., about 40 miles east of Levasy, at 11, before reaching St. Louis by the end of the day. The railroad consistently posts the train’s progress on Twitter (@UP_Steam).

The next day it goes to Arkansas. The railroad hasn’t posted the schedule for the return trip to Cheyenne, but sometimes in the past that route has involved a second pass through Kansas City.

Even though it’s not stopping in the area, the old steam engine is an impressive sight coming down the tracks, and people typically line up at intersections to get a photo, a video or just a glimpse. No. 844 is the same engine that pulled the Little Rock Express through the area last May, stopping in Buckner.

No. 844, delivered in 1944, was the last steam locomotive built for the Union Pacific. It was used in high-speed passenger service and then, for two years in the late ’50s, for freight service. It was retired in 1959 but then saved from the scrapyard in 1960. It’s been extensively restored and has logged hundreds of thousands of miles as the railroad’s goodwill ambassador.