Just a few days remain to pay 2012 Jackson County personal property taxes. They are due by midnight Monday.



In addition to taxes on real estate, Jackson County residents pay taxes on personal property such as vehicles, trailers, mobile homes, boats, aircraft, livestock, farm equipment and other items. Statements on personal property taxes were sent out weeks ago.

Just a few days remain to pay 2012 Jackson County personal property taxes. They are due by midnight Monday.

In addition to taxes on real estate, Jackson County residents pay taxes on personal property such as vehicles, trailers, mobile homes, boats, aircraft, livestock, farm equipment and other items. Statements on personal property taxes were sent out weeks ago.

There are several options:

-- Pay in person. The Courthouse Annex at 308 W. Kansas Ave. (just off the Square, behind the post office) and the County Courthouse at 415 E. 12th St. in downtown Kansas City are both open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. They are both open Monday, which is New Year’s Eve.

Also, on Monday the county will have a drop box for property tax payments at the front door of the annex in Independence and at the west door of the downtown Courthouse. Both will close at midnight. The county asks that cash not be put in either drop box.

-- Pay online. Go to www.jacksongov.org/ and follow the links from there. A payment must be posted by 11 p.m. Monday night to be considered on time. You can pay by e-check (with a 40-cent fee, the same as the vendor charges the county) or credit card. The county accepts MasterCard and Visa, and the bank charges a 2.395 percent fee for a credit/debit card online payment.

-- Mail it. For the county to count a payment as on time, it has to be postmarked no later than Dec. 31. County officials point out that mail put in a U.S. Postal Service drop box does not always get a postmark from that same day, and they strongly suggest checking with the Postal Service to find out the office hours for mail postmark. Officials also strongly suggest mailing your payment several days before the Dec. 31 deadline.

Taxes paid after Dec. 31 are subject to interest, penalties and fees.

Call the Assessment Department, 816-881-1330, with any questions.

Just a fraction of the amount a typical taxpayer sends to the county actually ends up in the county’s hands. By state law, counties collect taxes for school districts, fire districts, water districts, community colleges and libraries and other government entities. Jackson County officials say the share for county government actually comes to about seven cents of every dollar collected.

They give the example of a $150,000 home in Kansas City and in the Raytown School District. The taxes on that home would be $2,616.53, and most of that – $1,801.20, or 68.8 percent – would go to the school district. Another $442.01, or 16.9 percent, would go to the city, and $150.99, or 5.8 percent, would go to the county. At the county’s website, you can find the breakdown for your property.

The county has a program that helps even out the tax bite for some. Several years ago the county enacted the Senior Citizen Quad Payment program. It allows payment on some real estate taxes to be spread out over four equal installments by Dec. 31 of the tax year, then Feb. 28, May 31 and Aug. 31 of the following year. (It doesn’t apply to non-real-estate taxes such as on a vehicle.)

To qualify, a taxpayer must be 62 or older; must live at the address of the property being taxed; must own the real estate in fee simple or as a tenant; and must have previous taxes paid up. The property has to be assessed solely as residential. There’s an application process to get in the program. The county’s website – www.jacksongov.org/ – has more information.