I am in Arizona and it is beautiful! A few days ago, I flew into the Tucson Airport and the first thing I noticed was the Saguaro cactus through the airport windows. Cactus have their own kind of beauty.

I am in Arizona and it is beautiful! A few days ago, I flew into the Tucson Airport and the first thing I noticed was the Saguaro cactus through the airport windows. Cactus have their own kind of beauty.

After collecting my luggage, I walked outside to look for Adam’s wife Sam and the grandkids. I shed my coat, as I found 78-degree gorgeous weather.

I can’t figure out why I live in the land of winter, snow, and ice. When one can be relaxing under an orange or grapefruit tree versus shoveling their driveway, what is the choice?

Yes, it is lovely here and now I know why. When we lived in Arizona, we had snowbirds, people who flew south for the winter. I’m all for that.

Well, I actually came to help my sister Debbie with her first child’s wedding. Debbie’s son, Michael, married Jocelyn and it was a gorgeous wedding. All went well.

I also came to visit my son Adam, Sam, and the grandkids, Ethan and Malia. I’ve only gotten here one other time in the past five years. We really shouldn’t go that long without seeing our children.

Anyway, here I sit in Adam and Sam’s spare bedroom with Malia, an active 1-year-old crawling into my suitcase and throwing things everywhere. This little girl is something. She is a mover and a shaker!

I don’t remember my 1-year-olds being this active. If I can recall, not many walked at 12 months. But this girl not only walks, she runs. 

The first day here, I told Sam to go and rest. I told her I could watch Malia. When Sam walked out of the room, I looked around and Malia was gone, too. I could tell this was not going to be an easy task.

I found Malia sitting in the dog’s dish and trying to crunch a piece of dog food. About the same time, Sam hollered, “You need to put the gate up on the kitchen door, or Malia will get into the dog’s dish.”

So I grabbed Malia and proceeded to hook up the gate. When I turned around, Malia had disappeared and I went running. Sam then hollered, “You’ll need to close all the doors to the extra rooms or she’ll get into things.”

I answered “Sure,” as I ran desperately looking for a dangerous 1-year-old.

Sure enough, I found Malia in the bathroom, taking the toilet seat knobs off the base of the toilet and throwing her little train into the bowl. Her next goal was to flush but I caught her just in time.

As I attempted to put the bathroom back in order, she was gone again. She was very quiet, so I could not hear her, or find her.

I didn’t want Sam to know I was an inept grandma, so I acted like I was singing to Malia. Who knew where she was?

For the remaining hour, I chased her over the sofa, under the piano bench, into the linen cupboard, around the dining room table, and behind the living room blinds. When Sam woke, I looked like I had just run a 5K.

Within five minutes Malia had her bottle and was off to bed. Then, 2-year-old Ethan woke up. Oh my . . .

You know this flying south for the winter may not be what it is cracked up to be. It could be warm and wonderful, but this sweating stuff, while chasing grandkids, is for the birds.