Halloween is a time for children and adults alike to have some fun. Whether it be trick or treating, going to costume parties or haunted houses, or attending the Halloween Parade on the Square, this is a special time of year when vivid imaginations are set up against the beautiful backdrop of fall in the Midwest.

Halloween is a time for children and adults alike to have some fun. Whether it be trick or treating, going to costume parties or haunted houses, or attending the Halloween Parade on the Square, this is a special time of year when vivid imaginations are set up against the beautiful backdrop of fall in the Midwest.

There is no other time like it.

And while we should all take time to savor a day away from the regular grind and enjoy the holiday, safety should also be at top of mind.

Adults, as always, should be careful on the roadways and use designated drivers if adult beverages are part of the activities.

But Halloween is especially about the kids, and their safety is paramount. Trick-or-treating can be enjoyed safely in neighborhoods in which  parents are familiar. But there are also dozens of safe trick-or-treating events at area churches or organizations if parents are uncomfortable setting kids loose on the streets. Thumbs up to the organizers of these events for creating environments where the holiday can be enjoyed without worries. Check today’s Community Calendar on Page A7, or the Religous Notes on Pages C2-5 for some of activities turned into The Examiner.

For those dressing up for some trick-or-treating, American Medical Response based in Independence has released some safety tips to keep in mind:

n Leave the child’s face unobstructed. If a trick-or-treater wears a hat, be sure it fits well and doesn’t block vision. Safe “goblins” wear make-up on their faces, rather than masks or helmets that are hard to see, hear or breathe through.  n Stripe the costume with highly-reflective tape front and back, to make the trick-or-treater easier to see in the dark. Avoid dark costumes or camouflage. n Never let children trick-or-treat by themselves. Always make sure a child is accompanied by an adult. n Trick-or treat in well-lighted areas. Make sure each child has a flashlight to assist with walking from house to house. n Stay on the sidewalks and walk facing the traffic. Cross streets only at intersections. Don’t jump ditches. Stay alert. n Approach only those homes with porch lights or other front lights on. n Do not allow children to eat any treats until the group has returned home and an adult has examined the contents of each bag. n Do not eat anything that is even slightly suspicious. For example, look for commercially wrapped candy that may have been unwrapped and then re-wrapped.