Two local state representatives on Friday indicated they are unlikely to support major changes to commercial dog-breeding regulations that Missouri voters approved last fall.

Two local state representatives on Friday indicated they are unlikely to support major changes to commercial dog-breeding regulations that Missouri voters approved last fall.

Proposition B imposes rules on puppy mills, requiring that dogs be given fresh water, regular veterinary care and space to move around, and that their outdoor cages have some protection from the heat and cold. Many legislators have said those rules need to be repealed or greatly changed, and some have argued that the voters did not understand the issue.

State Rep. Sheila Solon, R-Blue Springs, dismissed that suggestion.

“People knew what they were voting on. They understood what they were voting on,” she said at a Grain Valley Chamber of Commerce luncheon.

Solon said some lobbyists have talked of Prop B changes to protect the owners of livestock – which she would support – but that all the bills floating around the Capitol deal only with dogs.

Rep. Jeanie Lauer, R-Blue Springs, noted that close to two-thirds of the voters in her district voted in favor of Prop B. She said sometimes constitutional amendments passed through the initiative process – passing petitions and not involving the General Assembly – do need small corrections.

“But as far as major overhauls, the voters have said that is what they want,” Lauer said, adding that it’s not her intent to reverse that.

Also discussed at Friday’s luncheon:

n Jan Reding of the Grain Valley Board of Education pressed Solon and Lauer to work on legislation to raise the bond capacity of school districts. It’s currently 15 percent of assessed valuation, but rapidly growing districts like those in Grain Valley, Blue Springs and Lee’s Summit often bump up against it. They grow and need new facilities, so they bond as much as the law allows, and then they have to wait for further growth to borrow more.

Reding said that means Grain Valley is constantly having to build a facility and then come back later with additions – a process she said basically doubles the cost.

“We desperately need the 20 percent,” she said.

Lauer said the issue is being discussed at the Capitol.

Solon and Rep. Noel Torpey, R-Independence, are promoting a new lottery game with the money directed to state veterans homes. A couple of funds that support those homes are expected to go into the red by 2013. The lottery issue might on the ballot in 2012.

“Hopefully the voters of Missouri will be supportive of this effort to save our veterans homes,” Solon said.