Before Chelsea Hisch realized it, graduation day was near.



Now, after Sunday’s commencement exercises at Kansas City’s Municipal Auditorium, Hisch and 420 other listed classmates are alumni of Blue Springs South High School.

Before Chelsea Hisch realized it, graduation day was near.

Now, after Sunday’s commencement exercises at Kansas City’s Municipal Auditorium, Hisch and 420 other listed classmates are alumni of Blue Springs South High School.

Her feelings made for a big smile, but with a tiny pinch of anxiety.

“It’s exciting but kind of scary at same time, not knowing what the future holds,” Hisch said after posing for a celebratory picture with her young siblings. “(Graduation) kind of snuck up on me. It seemed like it started going faster and faster the closer it got.

“I’m just cherishing memories with friends,” added Hisch, who plans on attending Metropolitan Community College-Longview and then the University of Missouri-Kansas City for nursing studies. “Some are going away to college, and time is precious.”

Alex Hall, who plans to attend UMKC for communication studies, with law school hopefully to follow, admitted that graduation and the inevitable life changes that accompany also snuck up on him.

“We always knew it would be coming; it came quickly at the end,” he said. “There’s a lot wanting to stay, but at the same time a lot of senioritis. People have a lot of mixed feelings.”

Class speakers Marleigh Gilyard and Emily Royer reminded their classmates that the rest of their lives now are in their hands.

Gilyard, who will major in business at the University of Arkansas, remembered the excitement she felt as a freshman, not thinking about the future.

“The future doesn’t just happen, so take advantage of opportunities,” she said.

“Find out what you want in life and go for it – that’s your only job,” Royer said later.

Royer, who will attend Truman State, also offered a moment of silence for classmate Tyler Bossow, who as listed in the commencement program but had died Wednesday after a short-term illness.

Paul Kinder, district superintendent, told the crowd Blue Springs South grads had amassed potential scholarship awards of $4.9 million.